Packaging

Book and edition-prints are packaged in a white slip-lid box. Format 39 cm x 39 cm. Wooden frame construction with a high quality cover. Cover screen printing.

Edition

Eight pictures of the footballs from the years 1930, 1954, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1990, 2006 and 2014 (individual selections available). Format 33 x 33 cm. Carbon prints on Fine Art paper 300 g Hahnemühle, (museum standard – high durability). The pictures are hand-signed and numbered. The footballs were photographed using analogue film material and then digitalised.

Book

60 pages, 33.5 cm x 33.5 cm format. Binding: Swiss binding. Black cover screen printing.

Circulation

1000 copies in English and 500 copies in German; limited and numbered.

Price

500 Euros incl. 7% German VAT. Shipping within Germany is free.

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Edition

Eight pictures of the footballs from the years 1930, 1954, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1990, 2006 and 2014 (individual selections available). Format 33 x 33 cm. Carbon prints on Fine Art paper 300 g Hahnemühle, (museum standard – high durability). The pictures are hand-signed and numbered. The footballs were photographed using analogue film material and then digitalised. The costs per print are 75 Euros incl. 7% German VAT.

Packaging

Book and edition-prints are packaged in a slip-lid box. Format 39 cm x 39 cm. Wooden frame construction with a high quality cover. Cover screen printing.

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Book

60 pages, 33.5 cm x 33.5 cm format. Binding: Swiss binding. Black cover screen printing.

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WC 1954 | Swiss WC Match Ball

In the old days, no two balls were alike. In 1954, personal skills and the varying quality of the leather material made each football unique, and maybe even gave them personality. Sepp Herberger, manager of the German national team, was supposed to be able to tell by the sound of a particular ball bouncing, if it was favourable or not. His player Fritz Walter once vividly characterised a ball: “It wouldn‘t play along, wouldn‘t hum, wouldn‘t respond to gentle touches, was neither comrade nor friend, but a stranger.” The ball used in the final in Bern – a Swiss product – was kind to him and his teammates nonetheless. The pitch was soaking wet, it was raining, so for the first time during World Cup play, shoes by Adi Dassler brandishing removable studs were used, and six minutes before the final whistle the slippery ball found its way to the foot of Helmut Rahn, who put a bouncer into the far corner, beyond the reach of the Hungarian goalkeeper. Herberger was presented with the ball, signed by all his players, after the final match. He was a keen collector; someone who even kept the menus from the national team’s training camps. Thank God for that. He stashed everything at his home in Weinheim on Bergstaße: 6500 photos, 50 films, 1500 books, 500 memorabilia, a grand total of 361 ring binders full of records for his planned memoirs, that he would never finish. Herberger never had children. After his death, his widow, Ev, gave most things away; some of it ending up even being thrown out. Not the archive and the ball, though. After Ev Herberger’s death in 1989, those became the property of the German Football Association, the DFB, where for years the records remained untouched. Nowadays, the ball that made the miracle at Bern possible rests in a vault at DFB headquarters in Frankfurt.

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WC 1962 | MR. CRACK

Bemoaning the quality of the ball is not a bad habit of modern players. In 1962, Uwe Seeler got quite upset over the Chilean ball: “This ball has no life, it is dead. You can’t really get any good contact on it, and it is very difficult to handle after a sharp pass or to maintain control over it in a fast run. The ball is too light. It climbs after striking it. But we simply must get used to it. Undoubtedly though, the South Americans will still have an advantage.” Hans Tilkowski raised an all too well-known accusation: “It wobbles.” All European teams favour European footballs. But Fifa didn‘t yet want to break with the tradition of using a ball manufactured by the host nation. The football by Chilean manufacturer Custodio Zamora H. was named Mr. Crack and did in fact reveal considerable flaws during the course of the tournament: it lost weight and colour. The Swiss president of Fifa’s organising committee, Ernst Thommen, soon found himself forced to allow the “Topstar”-model, the Swedish football of 1958, at tournament play, if both teams were to agree to it. Agreement was rare, however, at a World Cup tournament that would go down in history as the most vicious to date. One of the Italian players even had to be led off the field by the Chilean police, when he refused to leave the pitch after being sent off. The ball of the final match between Brazil and Czechoslovakia was donated to the Museo Del Calcio in Florence by the collector Giacomo Barsotti. A persistent rumour claims that, by order of a Brazilian millionaire, a second football from that final match was knocked out of the hands of the referee in the turmoil following the final whistle and then stolen. Undeniably, another Chilean ball from the match between Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia rests at the Sportmuseum Schweiz in Basel, Switzerland. It comes from the estate of Gottfried Dienst, the Swiss referee of that game.

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WC 2002 | Fevernova

The goalkeeper is the natural enemy of the ball. Because of its colourful design brandishing red and golden flames, contemptuous Italian national goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon ridicules the new World Cup ball “Fevernova” as a “bouncing ball for toddlers”. His German counterpart, Oliver Kahn, cares to phrase it a little touch more diplomatically: “Its trajectory might be a little different.” Belgian midfielder Marc Wilmots explains the resentment among the goalkeepers: “Some of them will suffer a rude awakening after a powerful shot.” Ireland‘s free-kick expert Ian Harte even dares to predict: “The behaviour in the air clearly differs from other products. With shots from twenty yards out, it will become difficult for goalkeepers to judge the flight path.” The new ball held up Oliver Kahn to ridicule literally right off the bat: in the first game using “Fevernova”, a friendly match between Germany and Israel and Kahn’s first game as team captain, the ball bounced back from the crossbar and then off Kahn‘s foot into his own net. According to its manufacturer, this latest hand-stitched ball is supposed to be 25 percent more precise and 10 percent faster than its predecessor “Tricolore”. The most important innovation: syntactic foam with gas-filled micro balloons, developed by Bayer AG, to dampen impact and stabilise trajectory. In addition, “Fevernova” breaks with the tango design. The golden colour represents the energy that South Korea and Japan invested into the World Cup 2002. The red flames represent fire traditionally regarded as driving force. Four triangles with a turbine in the middle are there to symbolise the technological achievements that both countries achieved in their recent past. 2000 “Fevernovas” travel to the World Cup in South Korea and Japan: practice balls for all teams and 15 footballs for each of the 64 games, 12 for the ballboys, three for the referees. Throughout the tournament, Oliver Kahn always manages to keep a firm grip on the ball and seems to make his peace with “Fevernova”. The German goalkeeper goes on to be voted his team‘s best player and that of the tournament. In the deciding moment of the final game against Brazil, however, “Fevernova” has the last laugh: Kahn fails to secure a seemingly harmless shot, the ball rebounds off his hands straight into the path of the advancing opponent. The shot came from 20 yards out. The ball in the photo is from the match between France and Uruguay and was raffled off by Coca-Cola. Today, it is part of the collection of René Sopp, who bought it on eBay one year later for 500 Euros.

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